Jeff Bridgman Antique Flags
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44 STAR ANTIQUE AMERICAN FLAG WITH AN HOURGLASS FORMATION OF STARS IN CANTED ROWS, AND AN EXTREMELY INTERESTING PRESENTATION FROM REPEATING SWATHS OF HEAVY OXIDATION, WYOMING STATEHOOD, 1890-1896

44 STAR ANTIQUE AMERICAN FLAG WITH AN HOURGLASS FORMATION OF STARS IN CANTED ROWS, AND AN EXTREMELY INTERESTING PRESENTATION FROM REPEATING SWATHS OF HEAVY OXIDATION, WYOMING STATEHOOD, 1890-1896

Web ID: 44j-916
Available: In Stock
Frame Size (H x L): 41.25" x 51.5"
Flag Size (H x L): 29.5" x 39.5"
 
Description:
Wyoming was admitted as the 44th state on July 10th, 1890. Although the 44 star count would not become official until July 4th of the following year, flag makers would have begun to add a 44th star immediately, if not even beforehand, in hopeful anticipation of a new state. This became common among flag-makers during the latter 19th century, a practice that reflected both their support of westward expansion and a drive not to be out-stepped by their competitors. While 44 remained the official count until July 3rd, 1896, it would have generally fallen out of use at the beginning of that year, when Utah gained statehood on January 4th.

The stars of this particular example are configured in rows of 8-7-7-7-7-8, with the top and bottom rows offset so that they resemble a broad hourglass. This lineal formation is often encountered on flags of this star count and is graphically attractive. Note how the stars in the first row are canted slightly to the left, with one point in the 11:00 position, followed by the next, with the stars canted slightly to the right, with one point directed at roughly 1:00. Alternating back-and forth throughout, note how this adds a substantial degree of movement to the overall presentation.

The most interesting graphic feature is actually present in something that one might incorrectly presume to be a detriment. Note how the repeating, diagonal swaths of golden brown oxidation, diminishing from the fly end as they sweep back towards the hoist, communicate the flag’s age in an artistic and almost modernistic fashion. Caused by acid transfer from its original, wooden staff, the overall effect leads to an endearing display of the flag’s history.

Mounting: The flag was mounted and framed within our own conservation department, which is led by expert staff. We take great care in the mounting and preservation of flags and have framed thousands of examples.

The black-painted and hand-gilded molding, with its wide and beautifully sculpted profile, is Italian. The background is 100% cotton twill, black in color, that has been washed and treated for colorfastness. The glazing is U.V. protective acrylic (Plexiglas). Feel free to inquire for more details.

Condition: In addition to the significant water staining, described above, there is a series of tack holes, along the hoist, with associated rust stains, where the flag was once affixed to a wooden staff. A small tear extends from one of these, into the first star in the bottom row. There is minor loss at the fly end of the last 4 white stripes, accompanied by a 4-inch tear along the top edge of the 4th red stripe, and a small, horizontal tear just below. Many of my clients prefer early flags to show their age and history of use. In this case, the wear and soiling actually contribute to the flag’s overall interest and value.
Video:
   
Collector Level: Intermediate-Level Collectors and Special Gifts
Flag Type: Parade flag
Star Count: 44
Earliest Date of Origin: 1890
Latest Date of Origin: 1896
State/Affiliation: Wyoming
War Association: 1866-1890 Indian Wars
Price: Please call (717) 676-0545 or (717) 502-1281
E-mail: info@jeffbridgman.com


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