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  PATRIOTIC WATERCOLOR OF AN EAGLE, IN THE FORM OF THE FEDERAL ARMS, WITH 13 RANDOMLY PLACED STARS, LIKELY DATING TO THE WAR OF 1812 (1812-1815)
Dimensions (inches): frame - 10.25" x 12", work - 4.5" x 6"
Description:
Pen and ink watercolor of a spread-winged American eagle, with a patriotic shield upon its breast, beneath a scattering of 13 stars. Painted with watercolors in mustard yellow and red, the work is executed on laid paper and is probably circa 1810-1820. The eagle grips the traditional arrows and olive branch and the head is facing the arrows, which is sometimes thought to indicate wartime manufacture. Here this may or may not be the case. Likely of Pennsylvania origin, the drawing may have been done in the patriotism of the War of 1812 (1812-1815). If executed later, on earlier parchment, it could, at the latest, be of Mexican War origin (1846-48). But the image with randomly placed stars is an early interpretation. This can be found on some of the oldest renditions of the Great Seal of the United States, before it’s actual adoption, as well as on other devices.

Whatever the case may be, paper was a premium and blank space in journals was seldom wasted. Drawings such as this were common in ledgers and journals, within Pennsylvania German communities.

Mounting: The black, ripple-profile, American frame has a gilded liner and dates to the period between 1830 and 1850. This is a pressure-mount between 100% cotton twill, black in color, and U.V. protective acrylic. The black fabric was washed to reduce excess dye. An acid-free agent was added to the wash to further set the dye, and the fabric was heat-treated for the same purpose.

Condition: There is minor foxing and the parchment is unevenly trimmed. Almost certainly torn from a small book or a journal, in which such drawings were common.
   
Primary Color: red, yellow
Earliest Date: 1810
Latest Date: 1846
For Sale Status: Available
Price SOLD
E-mail: info@jeffbridgman.com
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