Jeff Bridgman Antique Flags
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  PERHAPS THE BEST WWII SON-IN-SERVICE BANNER I HAVE EVER ENCOUNTERED, WITH AN ALL-AMERICAN SLOGAN THAT PERSONALIZES THE WAR AND 11 OF ITS 14 STARS ARRANGED IN A "V" FOR VICTORY

Available: Sold
Frame Size (H x L):
Flag Size (H x L): 97.5" x 58.25"
Description....:
PERHAPS THE BEST WWII SON-IN-SERVICE BANNER I HAVE EVER ENCOUNTERED, WITH AN ALL-AMERICAN SLOGAN THAT PERSONALIZES THE WAR AND 11 OF ITS 14 STARS ARRANGED IN A "V" FOR VICTORY:

In 1917, during WWI (U.S. involvement 1917-18), Colonel Robert L. Queisser of Ohio, formerly a member of the 5th Ohio Infantry, designed a patriotic banner called the "Service Emblem." This he created while laid up in the hospital, recovering from an injury that would lead to his eventual discharge from military service. Queisser, who had two sons overseas on the front line, thought that there should be a way for mothers, with sons and daughters in service during times of hostilities, be able to display this fact by hanging a banner on their front window or door. Generically these came to be called "son-in-service" banners by flag enthusiasts and collectors. Quickly accepted by various state and local governments, as well as by the War Department, the basic layout consisted of a vertically-oriented rectangle, with a red border, surrounding a white window, in which would be placed a blue star for each member of the family on active duty. All manner of variants of this generic pattern were soon being produced, some with shield-shaped emblems, devices, and verbiage, such as "Over There" or the name of the branch or division of service in which the family member was deployed.

Service banners with 1, 2, 3, or 4 stars for one family, soon morphed into designs produced for businesses and organizations. These could have hundreds of stars representing employees or members. On some, stars were simply arranged in justified or staggered rows. On others they might appear in any design that the maker elected, such as a shield, a letter, or an interesting geometric pattern. When a man or woman died during service, a gold star was to be placed over the blue. Other colors could also be added to display various factors such as wounded, POW / missing in action.

Made during WWII, this particular example is the best organizational-type service banner that I have ever personally encountered. Made for a neighborhood, rather than a business or social group, it bears a total of 14 stars, 11 of these arranged in a large "V-for-Victory," with a line of 3 below it, above which are the words "The Boys From Our Block." Though the words and imagery are simple, I have never seen an example that illustrates such a endearing and sentimental message in language so indicative of the era.

Mounting: The flag was mounted by our own conservation department, which is led by expert staff. We take great care in the mounting and preservation of flags and have framed thousands of examples.

Condition: There is minor soiling.
Collector Level: Flags for the truest Patriots. My best offerings
Flag Type: Sewn flag
Star Count:
Earliest Date of Origin: 1941
Latest Date of Origin: 1945
State/Affiliation:
War Association: WW 2
Price: SOLD
 

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