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PRO-UNION CIVIL WAR BROADSIDE WITH SPECTACULAR GRAPHICS THAT INCLUDE A LARGE IMAGE OF WASHINGTON INSIDE A STAR-SHAPED MEDALLION WITH 34 STARS, PHILADELPHIA, 1861-1863

Web ID: 34j-996
Available: In Stock
Frame Size (H x L): 31.25" x 36.75"
Flag Size (H x L): 21" x 26.75"
 
Description:
This very rare, pro-Union, Civil War period broadside is one of only a small handful known to exist. Printed as an insert to the Philadelphia Daily & Weekly Journal, it is a fantastic example of what is likely one of the earliest paper flags made for wartime patriotism. Spectacular graphics include a large image of George Washington, set within a star-shaped medallion. 34 small stars are distributed within the 5 arms of the large star. This reflects the number of states at the opening of the war (1861-1863). This image is set within the canton of the flag. Encircling the star is the following text, “Philada Evening Journal; Carr and Elliott Publishs.”. “OUR UNION FOREVER” is printed on the diagonal through the stripe field with an interesting striated font. At the top of the broadside, blue text reads, “Philadelphia daily and weekly journal.”, and at the bottom, is followed by, “Office, NO. 108 South Third Street.; Daily, 2 Cents per Copy . Weekly, $1 per Annum.”

The Philadelphia Evening Journal, a.k.a. the Philadelphia Daily and Weekly Journal, was a short-lived newspaper published daily (except Sunday) from 1856 through the middle of the Civil War in 1863. Despite its small window of existence, it had a long list of publishers, beginning with Grayson, Irwin & Montgomery, followed by F.W. Grayson & Co., then F.W. Grayson, then Carr & Elliot, then Charles N. Pine & A.E. Lewis, and finally C.N. Pine. When the war broke out in April of 1861, Carr & Elliott were the publishers. It seems likely that this broadside would have been inserted in an issue that closely followed the attack on Ft. Sumter.

I suspect that the “Carr” in “Carr & Elliott Publishing” was Robert Carr (1778-1866), who was the last member of the Bartram family to own and operate Bartram's Garden (from 1813 to 1850). Carr was also a distinguished printer (see Alexander Wilson's American Ornithology), as well as a militia officer and politician.

The Democratic Leader was the campaign edition of this newspaper between August of 1862 and June of 1863. At some point Carr & Elliott were no longer in ownership. By May of 1863 the publisher was Pine & Lewis. The publication appears to have disappeared following the Union Victory at Gettysburg, which occurred in the first days of July. The Democrats fell from favor during the Civil War. The party was moreover viewed to be in support of slavery. Lincoln became the first Republican to gain the White House in 1863, running on the anti-slavery ticket. One can imagine why a victory like that at Gettysburg might squelch support for Democrat politics. One of the most popular newspapers in the country was owned by Horace Greeley of New York. This was a Republican paper. When Greeley changed sides in the late 1860's and decided to bail Jefferson Davis out of jail, his paper soon folded. Greeley ran for president on the Democrat ticket against incumbent Ulysses S. Grant in 1872 and, despite many complaints made of the Grant White House, lost by a landslide.

A copy of this broadside is among the holdings of the Library Company of Philadelphia Library Company of Philadelphia (Books & Other Texts, Rare, 2# Am 1861 Carr, Accession Number (24)1540.F.78 (McAllister)). Mounting: This is a sandwich mount between 100% cotton, black in color, and U.V. protective acrylic. The black fabric was washed to reduce excess pigment. An acid-free agent was added to the wash to further set the pigment and the fabric was heat-treated for the same purpose. The mount was placed in a black-painted, hand-gilded and distressed Italian molding.

Condition: There are creases from where the parchment was folded into quarters, likely when it was inserted in the newspaper. There is mild foxing, particularly along the left and top borders. This is excellent overall condition, however, and this may be the best that exists among known examples.
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Collector Level: Advanced Collectors and the Person with Everything
Flag Type:
Star Count: 34
Earliest Date of Origin: 1861
Latest Date of Origin: 1861
State/Affiliation: Pennsylvania
War Association: 1861-1865 Civil War
Price: Please call (717) 676-0545 or (717) 502-1281
E-mail: info@jeffbridgman.com


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